Chinese Lover’s Day

Location: 100 3 Avenue SE

In September 2010, Vic Technicolour painted this mural to tell the story of the day Chinese people have dedicated to love just like western society has Valentine’s Day. Qi Qiao Jie, or the seventh eve, is often referred to as Chinese Lover’s Day.

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This day involves the position of the stars on the seventh day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar. Gift giving is not a common tradition of this holiday and is not widely known outside of Asia.

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History

NiuLang and ZhiNu were fairies living on opposite sides of the Milky Way. Feeling sorry for the two lonely spirits, the Jade Emperor of Heaven actively tried to bring them together. Unfortunately, he succeeded too well – NiuLang and ZhiNu became so enraptured with each other that they neglected their work. Annoyed, the Jade Emperor decreed that from that point on, the couple could only meet once a year; on the seventh night of the seventh moon.

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Present Day

To celebrate, many will burn paper offerings and look up at the stars to wish that one day they will fall in love. In Hong Kong, young girls continue the custom of displaying needlework, burn incense and make offerings to the night sky. Click here to learn more about Qi Qiao Jie.

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